Pimp my Ride 2: The Outfit.

If you’ll pardon the expression, there is another way to stand out as a wheelchair user besides decorating the wheelchair itself, and that is the way in which I decorate myself. I have always loved clothes, and it is rare that I am able to resist the tempting call of a sale rail or charity shop bargain. You don’t need to be rich to be stylish.

Showing personality can be as simple as wearing a graphic t-shirt, like a band or film t-shirt, immediately showing the world a little bit about yourself and your preferences without having to say a word. It gives people a way of talking to me that doesn’t immediately concern the wheeled contraption beneath my behind, and that can make social situations a great deal less awkward. When I went to see an amateur production of the stage musical American Idiot, no one had to ask why I would want to see the production simply because my beloved Green Day t-shirt spoke for me.

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Of course, I would hardly be able to go to a job in such an outfit, but formal attire doesn’t have to be dull either. One of my favourite items of clothing is a red skirt with black dots all over it, which I have affectionately christened the “ladybird skirt”. It’s bright and cheerful, and when I wear it I frequently receive complements about my sense of style. Paired with a linen blouse covered in large, black swirls, I look as ready as ever for any work situation, even if the blouse did come from a charity sale.

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Colour coordination is another simple trick I use to draw attention away from the wheelchair. Pairing black jeans with roses on the hips with a plain black top, studded belt, and red scarf is simple, but effective. With Jarred following me around like a lost puppy, I knew that was an outfit that I had thought out well.

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Even evening wear does not have to lack personality as a wheelchair user, although admittedly long, flowing gowns would only become entangled around the wheels and motors on my chair. The little black dress is a timeless classic, and is suitable for most occasions too. Paired with a little colour in the tights, I manage to give the dress a slight twist.

Bond Girl

I also own a leopard print dress, and another black dress, this time with silver sequins on the skirt. Both of these always seem to make people smile when I wear them, and I am told that they suit me well.

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None of these outfits have ever left me out of pocket, but flamboyance leaves people easily fooled. Before I begin to sound as if this was merely an excuse to show off the few photographs of me in existence that don’t look weird or dorky, I will say that the way I dress does actually have a purpose. It informs people that I am more than a girl in a wheelchair. It tells people that I am a human, with likes and dislikes, and that I can make choices for myself. I find that a little character goes a long way as a social outsider, and anything that helps others to feel less awkward towards disability can only be a good thing as we move towards equality.

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